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Declarative programming

What is declarative programming?

Declarative programming is a high-level programming concept. It is generally used in databases and configuration management software.

Declarative programming essentially is programming in which you write the code in a way that describes what you want to do, allowing the compiler to figure out how to do what you want to be done. Declarative programming is usually used along with a domain-specific language (DSL) to express what the user wants and shield them from low-level constructs that materialize the end state which is desired.

SQL and Prolog are examples of declarative programming languages.

Declarative programming vs. imperative programming

Imperative programming is instructional; it focuses on how to reach an end result. Declarative programming, on the other hand, concentrates on the end result and lets the compiler figure out how to achieve the stated outcome.

In declarative programming, you’re essentially saying something like this to the compiler: Here is what I want you to do, now it is up to you to decide how you will do it.”

While imperative programming concentrates on the intricacies of code setup, declarative programming allows the developer to concentrate on the actual resolution of the problem.

How does declarative programming work?

It depends on logic and constraints for defining the setup and the outcome. 

The constraints specify the properties that hold true in a particular programming scenario and are set up in software libraries or embedded in the language.

Logic programming expresses rules & facts regarding the domain in which the declarative programming is being used.

A domain-specific language (DSL) is used along with declarative programming so that the control flow is embedded in the language and exists separately from the logic.

What are the advantages of declarative programming?

Here are some of the advantages of declarative programming:

1. Readability

Since a DSL will tend to be more like a natural language than pseudocode, it is easier for non-programmers to read and learn it.


2. Reuse

Declarative programming makes it easy to create code that you can use for multiple purposes.


3. Commutativity

It is possible to express an end state, without needing to detail the order in which it will be implemented.


4. Error recovery

Declarative programming makes specifying constructs that stop at the first error much easier, which eliminates the need to add error listeners for all possible errors.


5. Idempotence

Declarative programming makes it possible for you to start with the end state and allow the program to figure it out for you.


6. Referential transparency

Expressions can be replaced with their corresponding value and the program’s behavior will not change.



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Declarative programming

October 14, 2020

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What is declarative programming?

Declarative programming is a high-level programming concept. It is generally used in databases and configuration management software.

Declarative programming essentially is programming in which you write the code in a way that describes what you want to do, allowing the compiler to figure out how to do what you want to be done. Declarative programming is usually used along with a domain-specific language (DSL) to express what the user wants and shield them from low-level constructs that materialize the end state which is desired.

SQL and Prolog are examples of declarative programming languages.

Declarative programming vs. imperative programming

Imperative programming is instructional; it focuses on how to reach an end result. Declarative programming, on the other hand, concentrates on the end result and lets the compiler figure out how to achieve the stated outcome.

In declarative programming, you’re essentially saying something like this to the compiler: Here is what I want you to do, now it is up to you to decide how you will do it.”

While imperative programming concentrates on the intricacies of code setup, declarative programming allows the developer to concentrate on the actual resolution of the problem.

How does declarative programming work?

It depends on logic and constraints for defining the setup and the outcome. 

The constraints specify the properties that hold true in a particular programming scenario and are set up in software libraries or embedded in the language.

Logic programming expresses rules & facts regarding the domain in which the declarative programming is being used.

A domain-specific language (DSL) is used along with declarative programming so that the control flow is embedded in the language and exists separately from the logic.

What are the advantages of declarative programming?

Here are some of the advantages of declarative programming:

1. Readability

Since a DSL will tend to be more like a natural language than pseudocode, it is easier for non-programmers to read and learn it.


2. Reuse

Declarative programming makes it easy to create code that you can use for multiple purposes.


3. Commutativity

It is possible to express an end state, without needing to detail the order in which it will be implemented.


4. Error recovery

Declarative programming makes specifying constructs that stop at the first error much easier, which eliminates the need to add error listeners for all possible errors.


5. Idempotence

Declarative programming makes it possible for you to start with the end state and allow the program to figure it out for you.


6. Referential transparency

Expressions can be replaced with their corresponding value and the program’s behavior will not change.



Thanks for reading! We hope you found this helpful.

Ready to level-up your business? Click here.

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